International journal of social sciences and humanities https://sciencescholar.us/journal/index.php/ijssh <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>IJSSH</strong>&nbsp;is published in English and it is open to authors around the world regardless of the nationality. It is currently published three times a year, i.e. in&nbsp;<em>April</em>,&nbsp;<em>August</em>, and&nbsp;<em>December</em>.&nbsp;</p> en-US <p>Articles published in the <em>International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities&nbsp;</em>(<strong>IJSSH</strong>)&nbsp;are available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives Licence (<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">CC BY-NC-ND 4.0</a>). Authors retain copyright in their work and grant <strong>IJSSH&nbsp;</strong>right of first publication under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. Users have the right to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles in this journal, and to use them for any other lawful purpose.</p> <p>Articles published in <strong>IJSSH&nbsp;</strong>can be copied, communicated and shared in their published form for non-commercial purposes provided full attribution is given to the author and the journal. Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (<em>e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book</em>), with an acknowledgment of its initial publication in this journal.</p> <p>This copyright notice applies to articles published in <strong>IJSSH&nbsp;</strong>volumes 4 onwards. Please read about the copyright notices for previous volumes under&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sciencescholar.us/journal/index.php/ijssh/history">Journal History</a>.</p> ijssh@utm.edu.ec (Martha Cecilia Escobar Garcia, Ph.D.) ss.support@utm.edu.ec (Vedran Vucic) Thu, 30 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.1.1.2 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Gendered access to indirect benefits from natural gas extraction in Kilwa District, Tanzania https://sciencescholar.us/journal/index.php/ijssh/article/view/382 <p style="text-align: justify;">Natural gas extraction contributes substantially to the economy of many countries around the world were natural gas resource is found. Despite its potential benefits, it is not known to what extent the benefits are equally enjoyed by both men and women in the respective host communities. The existing studies focus more on benefit-sharing at the national level and lack gender analysis. Using a cross-sectional design, a study was conducted to establish gendered access to indirect benefits from natural gas extraction. Quantitative data were collected from 373 households and qualitative data through focus group discussions, key informant interviews, and participant observation Findings revealed that about 53% of community members categorized access to indirect benefits to be of high level. The indirect benefits largely cut across investments and support in education, health, water, and employment opportunities. The study concludes that, while investment by Extractive Companies (ECs) has managed to improve health services the shortage of technical staff has remained unsolved. Likewise, while various benefits revealed to exist in education the chronic problem on girls drop<span style="text-decoration: line-through;">s</span> out of school remains to be a challenge.</p> Sarah Esil Mwakyambiki, Anna Nyakaunda Sikira, Fatihiya Ally Massawe ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://sciencescholar.us/journal/index.php/ijssh/article/view/382 Fri, 10 Jan 2020 12:19:43 +0000